How Much Flash Do I Need Part 2: Proving the Configuration

By Jim Sedgwick

Before making a costly Flash purchase, it’s always a good idea to use some science to forecast if the new storage hardware configuration, and especially the costly Flash you purchase, is going to be able to handle your workload. Is your planned purchase performance capacity actually too much, so that you aren’t getting your money’s worth? Or, even worse, is your planned hardware purchase too little?

In Part 1 of this blog, we discovered that our customer just might be planning to purchase more Flash capacity than their unique workload requires. In part 2 we will demonstrate how we were able to use modeling techniques to further understand how the proposed new storage configuration will handle their current workload. We will also project how this workload will affect response times when the workload increases into the future, as workloads tend to do.

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How Much Flash Do I Need? Part 1

By Jim Sedgwick

Flash, Flash, Flash. It seems that every storage manager has a new favorite question to ask about Flash storage. Do we need to move to Flash? How much of our workload can we move to Flash? Can we afford to move to Flash? Can we afford NOT to move to Flash?

Whether or not Flash is going to magically solve all our problems (it’s not), it’s here to stay. We know Flash has super-fast response times as well as other benefits, but for a little while yet, it’s still going to end up costing you more money. If you subscribe to the notion that it’s good to make sure you only purchase as much Flash as your unique workload needs, read on.

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Noisy Neighbors: Finding Root Cause of Performance Issues in IBM SVC Environments

By Jim SedgwickNoisy Neighbors

At some point or another, we have probably all experienced noisy neighbors, either at home, at work, or at school. There are just some people who don’t seem to understand the negative effect their loudness has on everyone around them.

Our storage environments also have these “noisy neighbors” whose presence or actions disrupt the performance of the rest of the storage environment. In this case, we’re going to take a look at an SVC all flash storage pool called EP-FLASH_3. Just a few bad LUNs have a profound effect on the I/O experience of the entire IBM Spectrum Virtualize (SVC) environment.

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